Children’s Rights

The Children’s Rights and Business Principles call on business everywhere, large and small, to respect and support children’s rights throughout their activities and business relationships, including in the workplace, marketplace, community and environment.

UNICEF, the UN Global Compact and Save the Children developed the Children’s Rights and Business Principles (CRBPs) to guide business in maximising their positive impacts and minimising their negative impacts on children. The CRBPs set out business actions to respect and support children’s rights.

The CRBPs are derived from internationally recognised human rights of children, and founded in the rights outlined in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (the most ratified human rights treaty in the world, ratified by Australia in 1990) and ILO Conventions No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labour and No. 138 on the Minimum Age.

“Children under 18 years old account for almost one third of the world’s population. It is inevitable that business, whether small or large, will interact with and have an effect on the lives of children both directly and indirectly. Children are key stakeholders of business – as consumers, family members of employees, young workers, and as future employees and business leaders. At the same time, children are key members of the communities in which business operates. Save the Children, the UN Global Compact and UNICEF hope that these Principles will serve as inspiration ad a guide for all business in their interactions with children.”

The Children’s Rights and Business Principles are that businesses should:


Principle 1: Meet their responsibility to respect children’s rights and commit to supporting the human rights of children.
Principle 2: Contribute to the elimination of child labour, including in all business activities and business relationships.
Principle 3: Provide decent work for young workers, parents and caregivers.
Principle 4: Ensure the protection and safety of children in all business activities and facilities.
Principle 5: Ensure that products and services are safe, and seek to support children’s rights through them.
Principle 6: Use marketing and advertising that respect and support children’s rights.
Principle 7: Respect and support children’s rights in relation to the environment and to land acquisition and use.
Principle 8: Respect and support children’s rights in security arrangements.
Principle 9: Help protect children affected by emergencies.
Principle 10: Reinforce community and government efforts to protect and fulfil children’s rights.

Engagement Platforms

Children’s Rights and Business Principles
Website: Children’s Rights and Business Principles

Key resources are available here

Get in touch to let us know what your business is doing to respect and support children’s rights